Quantcast Introduction - fy00_040009

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 


U.S. NAVY HEAVY WEATHER MOORING
SAFETY REQUIREMENTS
by
William N. Seelig, P.E.
1.0
INTRODUCTION
It is standard procedure for U.S. Navy ships to go to sea prior to forecasted
heavy weather, such as an approaching hurricane or major storm. However,
some ships, such as ships under repair, ships under construction, harbor
craft and other vessels may not be able to go to sea. These ships must be
securely moored in heavy weather to piers, wharves or Fleet Moorings to
ensure safety of the ships and surrounding structures and to prevent loss of
life.
2.0
PURPOSE
In 1999, NAVFAC and NFESC (Seelig, NFESC Report SSR-6150-OCN, 1999)
examined the Hampton Roads, Mayport and Ingleside heavy weather support
infrastructure for Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic. We concluded
that many facilities and moorings are inadequate to moor ships during heavy
weather. In addition, a review of accident reports indicates that the Navy has
incurred many tens of millions of dollars of accidents and ship movement
costs, due to inadequate heavy weather moorings. Therefore, Commander,
Naval Facilities Engineering Command (COMNAVFACENGCOM) tasked the
Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) to develop heavy
weather mooring criteria.
Three key deficiencies identified in these earlier studies are:
1) The lack of regional heavy weather mooring facility requirements,
2) The lack of consistent Navy-wide heavy weather environmental
criteria, and
3) The inconsistency of analytical methodologies.
3
NFESC TR-6012-OCN Rev B
U.S. NAVY HEAVY WEATHER
MOORING SAFETY REQUIREMENTS





 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +