Quantcast Entry Control Facility Design Philosophy

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 


5
Entry Control Facility Design Philosophy
The design of a given ECF will be based on determining the appropriate application of the
principles defined previously in order to satisfy the constraints of a given site. It is possible to
identify four different design scenarios by varying the distances available to provide the
approach zone and the response/safety zone (Ref. 1). Ref. 1 provides several conceptual
layouts for ECFs that represent these design scenarios. Regardless of the scenario, all ECFs
shall possess the minimum standards specified in the previous sections of this document.
The final design of an ECF will have to ensure that the concept of operations is fully defined
and supported. Many installations are identifying specific ECFs for different classifications of
traffic. One example would be identifying a specific gate for all truck access, that entry
control point would likely be designed to support truck traffic and standard vehicles. Other
gates at the installation may be designed to support only standard size vehicles. Due to the
potential array of vehicle sizes that may utilize a given facility, determining the design
vehicles for a given entry control facility is a critical decision. It is also important to recognize
that, even though a specific gate may be designated for large vehicle traffic, the possibility
of operator error may mean that other ECFs at the installation may still need the capability to
at least reject the larger vehicle.
5.1 Design Scenario 1
The first scenario occurs when there is a long distance between the base or installation
perimeter and the access control zone and another long distance available between the
access control zone and the main part of the installation (or safety zone). This implies there is
space available for a long approach zone to identify oncoming vehicles and a long response
zone to allow for security personnel to react to a potential threat, while providing an
adequate safety zone considering any nearby facilities or assets.
5.2 Design Scenario 2
The second scenario occurs when there is a long distance between the base or installation
perimeter and the access control zone and a short distance available between the access
control zone and the main part of the installation. This implies there is space available for a
long approach zone, but limited space for a response zone. This scenario may occur at an
installation located in a rural area with a long approach to the main part of the installation. It
is important to recognize if the response zone is so limited that it is determined that security
personnel will not have sufficient reaction time to deploy the active vehicle barrier system,
then the entry control point should be operated with the barriers in the closed position
(stopping vehicle flow) and opened for each authorized vehicle. This type of operation can
significantly reduce the throughput of the entry control point, however, it may be required in
order to provide a sufficient level of security.
5.3 Design Scenario 3
The third scenario occurs when there is a short distance between the base or installation
perimeter and the access control zone and a long distance between the access control zone
and the main part of the installation. This implies there is inadequate space to create an
40





 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.