Quantcast Chapter 4. Engineering and Operational Issues

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CHAPTER 4.
ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONAL ISSUES
Engineering and operational issues include the mechanics of obtaining
data, analyzing the data, and deciding on a plan of action to solve a
particular solid waste handling problem.  This chapter addresses the following
issues:
!
solid waste generation
!
technologies for
-
handling and storage of waste
-
collection of wastes
-
transfer and transport of waste
-
landfill design and operation
-
processing techniques and equipment
!
resource recovery and recycling
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wastes requiring special handling
!
hazardous wastes that may enter normally nonhazardous waste streams.
4.1
GENERATION OF SOLID WASTES
4.1.1
The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act defines solid wastes
as:
"Any garbage, refuse, sludge from a waste treatment plant, water
supply treatment plant, or air pollution control facility and other
discarded material including solid, liquid, semisolid, or contained
gaseous material resulting from industrial, commercial, mining, and
agricultural operations and from community activities, but does not
include solid or dissolved material in domestic sewage, or solid or
dissolved materials in irrigation return flows or industrial
discharges which are point-sources subject to permits under Section
402 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (86
Stat. 880), or source, special nuclear, or byproduct material as
defined by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (68 Stat.
923)."
4.1.2
The types and quantities of solid wastes generated will vary
geographically and seasonally.  Military installations often have unique
activities that generate wastes not found in ordinary municipal wastes.
Furthermore, populations at military installations do not follow a normal
growth pattern because the growth is controlled by mission requirements.
Consequently, determining accurate annual waste generation rates would require
a survey at the installation in question.
4.1.3
A knowledge of the quantities and characteristics of solid wastes
to be disposed of is important since these factors affect:
1.
method and frequency of pickup
4-1





 


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