Quantcast Transfer Station Costs

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2.
collection and transfer vehicle access
3.
availability of proposed site for use as a transfer station
4.
size of site required for initial transfer station operations and for
possible future expansion of transfer station operations or
construction of resource recovery facilities
5.
proposed future surrounding land use
6.
existing facilities adjacent to proposed site
7.
environmental impacts (e.g., visual, odors, etc.)
8.
foundation conditions
9.
central to existing and proposed future collection areas
10.
proximity to existing or projected future disposal location
11.
permitting requirements.
4.2.5.19
These factors can be used in establishing criteria for
judging the relative merits of each alternative site.
Permitting.  Items 2 and 9 are the most important
4.2.5.20
considerations.  Permitting requirements vary from state to state.  In some
states permits are not yet required.  In others (e.g., New Jersey) transfer
stations are viewed as waste disposal sites.  Procedurally, permitting the
transfer stations is no different than permitting a landfill, incinerator, or
recycling center.  Less total paperwork may be required for establishing a
transfer facility, but the number of steps is the same.
Transfer Station Costs
4.2.5.21
4.2.5.22
The following cost factors must be considered:
Capital Costs
!
building
!
land
!
transfer tractors and trailers
!
wheel or track loader
!
leveling and tamping equipment.
Annual Costs
! transfer vehicles
-
operation & maintenance (0&N)
-
taxes, licenses, and insurance
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