Quantcast Treatment Specifications

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accuracy of species identification should be confirmed prior to treatment. For these reasons, in-
spection of materials prior to treatment should be required in the procurement contract.
This can be accomplished by adding to the procurement contract:
For Utility Poles --Poles shall be inspected "in the white" within 10 days prior to treatment
for compliance with ANSI Standard 05.1. Upon inspection, poles shall be hammer branded on the
tip end with a brand that identifies both the agency and the inspector (Figure 6-1).
For Piles --All piles shall be inspected "in the white" within 10 days prior to treatment for
compliance with ASTM D25. Upon inspection, piles shall be hammer branded on the tip end with
a brand that identifies both the agency and the inspector (Figure 6-1).
For Railroad Ties --Within 10 days prior to treatment, railroad ties shall be inspected for
compliance with the American Railway Engineering Association specifications for crossties and
for confirmation with species requirements of the procurement contract. Upon inspection, ties
shall be hammer branded on one end with a band that identifies species in accordance with sym-
bols defined in AWPA Standard M6 and identifies both the inspection agency and the inspector.
For Lumber and Timbers --Lumber and timber shall be inspected in accordance with the ap-
propriate grading rules based on species and shall be marked with a stamp or brand from an agen-
cy approved by the American Lumber Standards Committee. When lumber and timbers are used
where strength is not a critical factor, the material is not always graded.
For Plywood --Plywood and structural use panels shall be marked with a stamp or brand
by an agency in conformance to standards set by the American Plywood Association.
6.1.2 Treatment Specifications. The proper choice and application of preservative for the
intended end use is critical to the successful performance of the treated product. Standards re-
quire different preservative retentions for different use environments. Substitution of materials
properly treated for one environment into another environment may contribute to early structural
failure or unacceptable aesthetic qualities. Marine exposures, for example, require heavier reten-
tions of preservatives than are required for use in ground contact. Marine exposures also utilize
preservatives such as creosote that are not acceptable for indoor use.
6.1.2.1 Major Components. The American Wood Preservers Association addres-
ses chemical, process, and performance requirements for preservative pressure treated wood
products. These standards identify acceptable preservatives and define their chemical composition
and that of the related carriers (solvents). The standards also define the amount of each type of
preservative and the depth of penetration required by commodity and species of wood. Processing
parameters such as temperature are also specified. (For some commodities, such as poles, the pre-
servative penetration and retention within a given assay zone will vary with species). Sampling
protocols for inspecting treated wood products and methods for care and handling products after
treatment are also addressed.
6-3





 


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