Quantcast Figure 4-20. Double-Hung Window: Dos and Do nets

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 


DOUBLE-HUNG WINDOW: DOS AND DON'TS
Figure 4-20.
Double-Hung Window:
Dos and Do nets.
(Illustration:
Blair Prentice, Rehab Right:  How to Realize the
Full Value of Your Old House, Copyright 1978 & 1986, City of
Oakland, CA)
Rust and Paint Removal.  Rust can be removed by hand with
wire brushes or aluminum oxide sandpaper, or with a power tool
such as an electric drill with wire brush or rotary whip
attachment.
(Protect adjacent window sills and jambs. ) Chemical
rust removers also work well; but do not use hydrochloric acid,
as it leaves deposits that can cause further corrosion.  Protect
masonry and glass from chemicals with plastic sheets.  Remove
chemical residues from metal with damp cloths (not running water)
and dry thoroughly immediately.  Do not use oxy-acetylene or
propane torches to burn off rust.  Intense heat can distort the
metal and break the window glass.  It also vaporizes the lead in
old paint.  Low pressure sandblasting (80-100 pounds per square
inch) using #10-#45 grit or glass pellets can be used to remove
heavier rust (after removing the window glass).  Bare metal
should be wiped with denatured alcohol or other cleaning solvent,
quickly wiped dry, and primed immediately with two coats of an
anti-corrosive, oil-alkyd-based paint containing zinc or zinc
chromate.
4-41





 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.