Quantcast Cathodic Protection Systems,Interim Technical Guidance

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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING COMMAND
1510 GILBERT ST
NORFOLK, VA 23511-2699
IN REPLY REFER TO:
11012
04C/cmm
31 MAY 1994
From: Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (Code 15C)
To:
Distribution
Subj:
CATHODIC PROTECTION SYSTEMS, INTERIM TECHNICAL GUIDANCE
Ref:
(a) DPL-90-0006, Cathodic Protection Systems, Policy Guide
(b) CFR Title 49 Chapter 1, Part 192, Transportation of Natural and Other Gas by
Pipeline; and Part 195, Transportation of Liquids by Pipeline
(c) CFR Title 40 Part 280, Technical Standards and Corrective Action for Owners
and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks
(d) MIL-HDBK-1004/10, Electrical Engineering. Cathodic Protection
(e) NAVFAC MO-306, Maintenance and Operation of Cathodic Protection Systems
(f) NAVFACINST 11014.52
Encl:
(1) Interim Design Criteria for Cathodic Protection Systems
(2) EFD Points of Contact for Corrosion Control, October 93
1. Purpose:  To provide interim technical guidance for the use of cathodic protection
systems (CPS) in shore utility systems and facilities. The guidance can be retained for record
purposes until it is incorporated in the criteria noted in paragraph 4.d. This guidance
supersedes and cancels reference (a).
2. Background: CPS reduce corrosion of buried or submerged metallic structures and
utility systems, thus reducing the probability of failure with concomitant environmental,
operational, safety and economic repercussions. Environmental laws prohibit the leakage of
hazardous material into the environment. Additionally, the Navy spends millions of dollars
annually repairing and replacing corroded metallic utility systems and structures that are
unprotected by CPS. References (b) and (c) require the installation of CPS on certain buried
or submerged steel gas, fuel and other hazardous material pipelines and storage facilities.
However, in many cases CPS are not considered in the planning or design of such systems.
Structures in corrosive environments also benefit from the installation of CPS, but are rarely
considered for such protection. Some rehabilitation applications such as driving new sheet
piling outboard of existing deteriorated piling, may result in the new sheet piling being anodic
to the old and thus accelerating corrosion of the new sheet piling. Other similar rehabilitation
projects may also incur a risk that repairs will accelerate corrosion. Finally, some NFGS
guide specification sections currently do not adequately specify CPS requirements.
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